Missouri Monthly Jobs Report

August 2021

Missouri non-farm payroll employment increased from July 2021 to August 2021, and the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by two-tenths of a percentage point. Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 7,300 jobs over the month, with job gains in both goods-producing and service-providing industries. The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 4.0 percent in August 2021, down from 4.2 percent in July 2021. Recovery from COVID-19-related layoffs continued with an increase of 73,400 jobs from August 2020 to August 2021. Short-term shortages of semiconductor chips may hold down employment in manufacturing in the next few months. 

UNEMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by two-tenths of a percentage point in August 2021, dropping to 4.0 percent from the July 2021 rate of 4.2 percent.

The national unemployment rate decreased from 5.4 percent in July 2021 to 5.2 percent in August 2021. The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 123,158 in August 2021, down by 5,448 from July’s 128,606.

The state’s not-seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate also decreased in August 2021, dropping by 0.4 percentage points to 3.5 percent from the July 2021 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 3.9 percent. The decrease resulted from the recall of manufacturing workers from short-term layoff. The corresponding not-seasonally-adjusted national rate for August 2021 was 5.3 percent. 

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 6.0 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was 6.1 percent.

With the start of the COVID-19 pandemic now more than a year in the past, the August 2021 rate was 2.0 percentage points lower than the August 2020 rate. The rate had reached a low of 3.1 percent starting in July 2018, before gradually edging up to 3.5 percent by the end of 2019, and then to 3.7 percent in March 2020. The COVID-19 effect hit in April 2020, spiking the rate to 12.5 percent for that month. The rate decreased monthly for the rest of 2020, reaching 4.4 percent in December, and continued gradually downward through the first four months of 2021. The increase of two-tenths of a percentage point from April 2021 to June 2021 appeared to be related to a temporary shortage in the supply of semiconductor chips, which caused production slowdowns in some manufacturing industries.

Due to benchmark revisions, Missouri’s unemployment rate rose a tenth of a percentage point higher than the national rate in January and February of 2020, but has been below the national rate for every month since February 2020.

EMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,839,400 in August 2021, up by 7,300 from the revised July 2021 figure. However, the July 2021 total was revised downward by 3,600 from the preliminary estimate, producing a revised increase of 11,400 jobs from June 2021 to July 2021 and a revised increase of 80,300 jobs from July 2020 to July 2021.

Goods-producing industries gained 5,300 jobs over the month, in manufacturing, with gains in both durable and non-durable goods. Meanwhile, service-providing industries gained 2,000 jobs between July and August 2021, with increases in leisure & hospitality (+3,300 jobs) and professional & business services (+1,600 jobs). Government employment showed a decrease of 3,200 jobs over the month. 

Total payroll employment increased by 73,400 jobs from August 2020 to August 2021, reflecting the recovery from job cuts brought on by the initial wave of COVID-19 infections. All but one of the major private-sector industry groups shared in the increases, with the largest gain in leisure & hospitality (+33,700 jobs), followed by professional and business services (+17,700 jobs), educational & health services (+12,100 jobs), and trade, transportation & utilities (+8,700 jobs). The sole private-sector exception was financial activities, which lost 5,600 jobs. Government employment decreased over the year, with a loss of 6,200 jobs concentrated in federal and local government.

See the full Jobs Report here.

July 2021

July 2021 Monthly Jobs Report
Missouri adds 15,000 jobs over the month

Missouri non-farm payroll employment increased from June 2021 to July 2021, and the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by a tenth of a percentage point. Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 15,000 jobs over the month, with job gains in both goods-producing and service-providing industries. The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 4.2 percent in July 2021, down from 4.3 percent in June 2021. Recovery from COVID-19-related layoffs continued with an increase of more than 83,900 jobs from July 2020 to July 2021. Short-term shortages of semiconductor chips may hold down employment in manufacturing in the next few months and the emergence of the delta variant of COVID-19 may impact longer-term growth.

UNEMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by a tenth of a percentage point in July 2021, dropping to 4.2 percent from the June 2021 rate of 4.3 percent. With the start of the COVID-19 pandemic now more than a year in the past, the July 2021 rate was 2.6 percentage points lower than the July 2020 rate. The rate had reached a low of 3.1 percent starting in July 2018, before gradually edging up to 3.5 percent by the end of 2019, and then to 3.7 percent in March 2020. The COVID-19 effect hit in April 2020, spiking the rate to 12.5 percent for that month. The rate decreased monthly for the rest of 2020, reaching 4.4 percent in December, and continued gradually downward through the first four months of 2021. The increase of two-tenths of a percentage point from April 2021 to June 2021over the last two months appeared to be related to a temporary shortage in the supply of semiconductor chips, which caused production slowdowns in some manufacturing industries. 

Due to benchmark revisions, Missouri’s unemployment rate rose a tenth of a percentage point higher than the national rate in January and February of 2020, but has been below the national rate for every month since February 2020. The national unemployment rate decreased from 5.9 percent in June 2021 to 5.4 percent in July 2021. The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 128,685 in July 2021, down by 4,639 from June’s 133,324.

The state’s not-seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate also decreased in July 2021, dropping by 1.2 percentage points to 3.9 percent from the June 2021 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 5.1 percent. The decrease resulted from the recall of manufacturing workers from short-term layoff. The corresponding not-seasonally-adjusted national rate for July 2021 was 5.7 percent.   

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 6.8 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was 7.3 percent.

EMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,835,700 in July 2021, up by 15,000 from the revised June 2021 figure. However, the June 2021 total was revised downward by 2,700 from the preliminary estimate, producing a revised increase of 1,500 jobs from May 2021 to June 2021 and a revised increase of 131,100 jobs from June 2020 to June 2021.

Goods-producing industries gained 800 jobs over the month, in manufacturing, with gains in both durable and non-durable goods and electronics manufacturing. These gains were enough to offset an employment loss in motor vehicle manufacturing, which was hampered by a shortage of semiconductor chips for on-board computers.  Meanwhile, service-providing industries gained 14,200 jobs between June and July 2021, with increases in leisure & hospitality (+3,500 jobs) and professional & business services (+3,100 jobs). Government employment showed an increase of 6,700 jobs over the month. 

Total payroll employment increased by 83,900 jobs from July 2020 to July 2021, reflecting the recovery from job cuts brought on by the initial wave of COVID-19 infections. All but one of the major private-sector industry groups shared in the increases, with the largest gain in leisure & hospitality (+29,400 jobs), followed by professional and business services (+20,200 jobs), educational & health services (+18,000 jobs), and trade, transportation & utilities (+9,400 jobs). The sole private-sector exception was financial activities, which lost 3,800 jobs. Government employment decreased over the year, with a loss of 100 jobs concentrated in federal and local government. 

See the full Jobs Report here.

June 2021

June 2021 Monthly Jobs Report
Missouri labor market sees 130,000 jobs in the last year

With the initial wave of COVID-19-related layoffs now more than a year in the past, the six-figure over-the-year job losses that had characterized the Missouri labor market for the last nine months of 2020 and the first three months of 2021 were replaced with an increase of more than 130,000 jobs from June 2020 to June 2021. Missouri non-farm payroll employment increased from May 2021 to June 2021, but the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate also increased by a tenth of a percentage point. Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 4,200 jobs over the month, with job gains in both goods-producing and service-providing industries. The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 4.3 percent in June 2021, up from 4.2 percent in May 2021. Short-term shortages of semiconductor chips may hold down employment in manufacturing in the next few months. 

UNEMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased by a tenth of a percentage point in June 2021, rising to 4.3 percent from the May 2021 rate of 4.2 percent. With the start of the COVID-19 pandemic now more than a year in the past, the June 2021 rate was 3.8 percentage points lower than the June 2020 rate. The rate had reached a low of 3.1 percent starting in July 2018, before gradually edging up to 3.5 percent by the end of 2019, and then to 3.7 percent in March 2020. The COVID-19 effect hit in April 2020, spiking the rate to 12.5 percent for that month. The rate decreased monthly for the rest of 2020, reaching 4.4 percent in December, and continued gradually downward through the first four months of 2021. The increase of two-tenths of a percentage point over the last two months appears to be related to a temporary shortage in the supply of semiconductor chips, which caused production slowdowns in some manufacturing industries. 

Due to benchmark revisions, Missouri’s unemployment rate rose a tenth of a percentage point higher than the national rate in January and February of 2020, but has been below the national rate for every month since February 2020. The national unemployment rate increased from 5.8 percent in May 2021 to 5.9 percent in June 2021. The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 133,380 in June 2021, up by 4,343 from May’s 129,037.

The state’s not-seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate also increased in June 2021, rising by four-tenths of a percentage point to 5.1 percent from the May 2021 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 4.7 percent. The shortage of semiconductor chips was a factor in the increase. The corresponding not-seasonally-adjusted national rate for June 2021 was 6.1 percent.   

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 8.1 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was also 8.1 percent.

EMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,823,400 in June 2021, up by 4,200 from the revised May 2021 figure. However, the May 2021 total was revised upward by 1,200 from the preliminary estimate, producing a revised increase of 7,200 jobs from April 2021 to May 2021 and a revised increase of 196,100 jobs from May 2020 to May 2021. (See “Revisions” below.)

Goods-producing industries gained 200 jobs over the month, in construction and manufacturing, with gains in non-durable goods and electronics manufacturing. These gains were enough to offset an employment loss in motor vehicle manufacturing, which was hampered by a shortage of semiconductor chips for on-board computers.  Meanwhile, service-providing industries gained 4,000 jobs between May and June 2021, with increases in professional & business services (+2,700 jobs) and leisure & hospitality (+1,600 jobs) at least partially attributable to the easing of COVID-19 restrictions. However, not every major industry group shared in the increase, with educational and health service losing 900 jobs over the month. Government employment showed an increase of 1,600 jobs over the month. 

Total payroll employment increased by 133,800 jobs from June 2020 to June 2021, reflecting the recovery from the job cuts brought on by the initial wave of COVID-19 restrictions. All but one of the major private-sector industry groups shared in the increases, with the largest gain in leisure & hospitality (+48,400 jobs), followed by educational & health services (+22,300 jobs), professional and business services (+21,500 jobs), and trade, transportation & utilities (+12,900 jobs). The sole private-sector exception was financial activities, which lost 3,400 jobs. Government employment also increased over the year, with a gain of 18,100 jobs concentrated in state and local government. 

See the full Jobs Report here.

May 2021

Missouri non-farm payroll employment increased from April 2021 to May 2021, but the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased by a tenth of a percentage point. Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 6,000 jobs over the month, with job gains in both goods-producing and service-providing industries. The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 4.2 percent in May 2021, up from 4.1 percent in April 2021. With the initial wave of COVID-19-related layoffs now more than a year in the past, the six-figure over-the-year job losses that had characterized the Missouri labor market for the last nine months of 2020 and the first three months of 2021 were replaced with an increase of nearly 200,000 jobs from May 2020 to May 2021. Long-term improvement can be expected but short-term shortages of semiconductor chips may hold down employment in manufacturing in the next few months.

UNEMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased by a tenth of a percentage point in May 2021, rising to 4.2 percent from the April 2021 rate of 4.1 percent. The May 2021 rate was 5.4 percentage points lower than the May 2020 rate. The rate had reached a low of 3.1 percent starting in July 2018, before gradually edging up to 3.5 percent by the end of 2019, and then to 3.7 percent in March 2020. The COVID-19 effect hit in April 2020, spiking the rate to 12.5 percent for that month. The rate decreased monthly for the rest of 2020, reaching 4.4 percent in December, and continued gradually downward through the first four months of 2021. The increase of a tenth of a percentage point in May 2021 appears to be related to a temporary shortage in the supply of semiconductor chips, which caused production slowdowns in some manufacturing industries.

Due to benchmark revisions, Missouri’s unemployment rate rose a tenth of a percentage point higher than the national rate in January and February of 2020, but has been below the national rate for every month since February 2020. The national unemployment rate decreased from 6.1 percent in April 2021 to 5.8 percent in May 2021. The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 128,770 in May 2021, up by 1,824 from April’s 126,946. Missouri’s total civilian labor force increased by 4,440 in May compared to April and there are over 150,000 fewer Missourians unemployed than in May 2020.

The state’s not-seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate had an unusual increase in May 2021, rising by six-tenths of a percentage point to 4.7 percent from the April 2021 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 4.1 percent. The shortage of semiconductor chips, along with chilly, rainy weather that put a damper on outdoor activities, were factors in the increase. The corresponding not-seasonally-adjusted national rate for May 2021 was 5.5 percent.  

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 9.6 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was 9.7 percent.

EMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,818,000 in May 2021, up by 6,000 from the revised April 2021 figure. Goods-producing industries gained 1,500 jobs over the month, all in manufacturing, with gains in non-durable goods and electronics manufacturing. These gains were enough to offset an employment loss in motor vehicle manufacturing, which was hampered by a shortage of semiconductor chips for on-board computers.  Meanwhile, service-providing industries gained 4,500 jobs between April and May 2021, with increases in professional & business services (+2,900 jobs) leisure & hospitality (+2,800 jobs) and educational & health services (+2,500 jobs) at least partially attributable to the easing of COVID-19 restrictions. However, not every major industry group shared in the increase, with trade, transportation & utilities losing 3,800 jobs over the month. Government employment showed little change over the month.

Total payroll employment increased by 194,900 jobs from May 2020 to May 2021, reflecting the recovery from the job cuts brought on by the initial wave of COVID-19 infections. All but one of the major private-sector industry groups shared in the increases, with the largest gain in leisure & hospitality (+74,500 jobs), followed by trade, transportation & utilities (+32,100 jobs), educational & health services (+27,300 jobs) and professional & business services (+19,700 jobs). The sole private-sector exception was financial activities, which lost 1,700 jobs. Government employment also increased over the year, with a gain of 16,000 jobs concentrated in state and local government.

See the full Jobs Report here.

April 2021

Missouri non-farm payroll employment showed little overall change from March 2021 to April 2021, and the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by a tenth of a percentage point. Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 600 jobs over the month. The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 4.1 percent in April 2021, down from 4.2 percent in March 2021. The Missouri labor market showed an increase of nearly a quarter million jobs from April 2020 to April 2021.

UNEMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by a tenth of a percentage point in April 2021, dropping to 4.1 percent from the March 2021 rate of 4.2 percent. With the start of the COVID-19 pandemic now a year in the past, the April 2021 rate was 8.4 percentage points lower than the April 2020 rate. The rate had reached a low of 3.1 percent starting in July 2018, before gradually edging up to 3.5 percent by the end of 2019, and then to 3.7 percent in March 2020. The COVID-19 effect hit in April 2020, spiking the rate to 12.5 percent for that month. The rate decreased monthly for the rest of 2020, reaching 4.4 percent in December, and has continued gradually downward through the first four months of 2021. Missouri’s unemployment rate has been below the national rate for every month since February 2020. The national unemployment rate increased from 6.0 percent in March 2021 to 6.1 percent in April 2021. 

The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 126,758 in April 2021, down by 1,303 from March’s 128,061.

Improved weather and the gradual return to a post-COVID economy helped to push the state’s not-seasonally-adjusted rate down to 4.0 percent in April 2021, four-tenths of a percentage point lower than the March 2021 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 4.4 percent. The corresponding not-seasonally-adjusted national rate for April 2021 was 5.7 percent.  

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 12.5 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was 12.3 percent.

EMPLOYMENT 

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,815,000 in April 2021, up by 600 from the revised March 2021 figure. However, the March 2021 total was revised upward by 2,500 from the preliminary estimate, producing a revised increase of 17,900 jobs from February 2021 to March 2021 and a revised decrease of 98,000 jobs from March 2020 to March 2021.

Goods-producing industries lost 2,000 jobs over the month, all in manufacturing, as the production of new motor vehicles was hampered by a shortage of semiconductor chips for on-board computers. Meanwhile, service-providing industries gained 2,600 jobs between March and April 2021, with increases in leisure & hospitality (+5,200 jobs) and educational & health services (+1,700 jobs) directly attributable to the easing of COVID-19 restrictions. A loss of 2,500 jobs in professional & business services appeared to be the result of an extension of the federal tax filing deadline and the resulting decrease in the seasonal hiring of tax processors. Trade, transportation & utilities lost 2,100 jobs over the month, with losses concentrated in wholesale and retail trade. Government employment showed little change over the month. 

Total payroll employment increased by 245,600 jobs from April 2020 to April 2021, reflecting the recovery from the extensive job cuts brought on in April 2020 by the initial wave of COVID-19 infections. All but one of the major private-sector industry groups shared in the increases, with the largest gain in leisure & hospitality (+103,700 jobs), followed by trade, transportation & utilities (+53,100 jobs), educational & health services (+29,400 jobs) and professional & business services (+22,900 jobs). Government employment decreased over the year, with a loss of 1,800 jobs concentrated in state government.

See the full Jobs Report here.
 

March 2021

Missouri non-farm payroll employment recovered strongly in March 2021 after a loss in February, and the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by a tenth of a percentage point. Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 15,400 jobs over the month. The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 4.2 percent in March 2021, down from 4.3 percent in February 2021. Job losses over the year, while still severe, decreased from 130,100 in February 2021 to 100,500 in March 2021. Further improvement is expected in the spring as weather conditions improve and as COVID-19 vaccinations become more widely available. 

UNEMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by a tenth of a percentage point in March 2021, dropping to 4.2 percent from the February 2021 rate of 4.3 percent. Due to the lingering effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, the March 2021 rate was 0.5 percentage points higher than the March 2020 rate. The rate had reached a low of 3.1 percent starting in July 2018, before gradually edging up to 3.5 percent by the end of 2019, and then to 3.7 percent in March 2020. The COVID-19 effect hit in April 2020, spiking the rate to 12.5 percent for that month. The state’s unemployment rate has declined or remained steady each month since April 2020 and was below the U.S. rate of 6.0 percent in March 2021.

The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 128,920 in March 2021, down by 3,618 from February’s 132,538.

Improved weather helped to push the state’s not-seasonally-adjusted rate down to 4.4 percent in March 2021, eight-tenths of a percentage point lower than the February 2021 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 5.2 percent. The corresponding not-seasonally-adjusted national rate for March 2021 was 6.2 percent.  

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 3.7 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was 4.4 percent.

EMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,811,900 in March 2021, up by 15,400 from the revised February 2021 figure. In addition, the February 2021 total was revised upward by 400 from the preliminary estimate, producing a revised decrease of 11,200 jobs from January 2021 to February 2021 and a revised decrease of 130,100 jobs from February 2020 to February 2021.

Goods-producing industries added 7,000 jobs over the month, with increases of 3,900 in mining, logging & construction and 3,100 in manufacturing. Meanwhile, service-providing industries gained 8,400 jobs between February and March 2021, with increases in educational & health services (+8,100 jobs), professional & business services (+2,200 jobs), leisure & hospitality (+600 jobs) and “other services” (+200 jobs) outweighing losses in financial activities (-1,700 jobs), information (-700 jobs), and trade, transportation & utilities (-300 jobs). Government employment was unchanged over the month, with losses in federal and local government balanced by a gain in state government.

Total payroll employment decreased by 100,500 jobs from March 2020 to March 2021. As in previous months, over-the-year job losses were widespread among the major sectors of the labor market, with only trade, transportation & utilities spared. Goods-producing industries lost 7,100 jobs over the year, with a large decrease (-6,400 jobs) in manufacturing and a smaller decrease (-700 jobs) in mining, logging & construction. Service-providing industries were more severely impacted, losing 93,400 jobs over the year, with leisure & hospitality (-41,000 jobs) continuing to take the hardest hit from the COVID-19 pandemic. Professional & business services lost 11,000 jobs over the year, educational & health services lost 9,000 jobs, “other services” lost 5,800 jobs and information lost 3,500 jobs. Trade, transportation & utilities gained 1,200 jobs over the year, with all the increase coming in transportation, warehousing & utilities. Government employment decreased by 18,100 over the year, with major decreases in state and local government.

See the full Jobs Report here.

February 2021

Missouri non-farm payroll employment decreased in February 2021, probably the result of deteriorating weather conditions. However, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by a tenth of a percentage point. Employment, seasonally adjusted, decreased by 11,600 jobs over the month, and over-the year job losses totaled 130,500. The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 4.2 percent in February 2021, down from 4.3 percent in January 2021. The labor market still showed substantial losses over the year, but may show improvement in the coming months as vaccines for COVID-19 become available. 

UNEMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by a tenth of a percentage point in February 2021, dropping to 4.2 percent from the benchmarked January 2021 rate of 4.3 percent. The corresponding national rate was 6.2 percent in February 2021, down from 6.3 percent in January 2021, up from 3.5 percent in February 2020. Due to the lingering effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, the February 2021 rate for Missouri was 0.6 percentage points higher than the February 2020 rate. The rate had reached a low of 3.1 percent starting in July 2018, before gradually edging up to 3.5 percent by the end of 2019, and then to 3.7 percent in March 2020. The COVID-19 effect hit in April 2020, spiking the rate to 12.5 percent for that month. The rate decreased monthly for the rest of 2020, reaching 4.3 percent in January. Missouri’s unemployment rate remained below the national rate.  

The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 128,934 in February 2021, down by 1,615 from January’s 130,549.

The state’s not-seasonally-adjusted rate was 5.0 percent in February 2021, also down by a tenth of a percentage point from the January 2021 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 5.1 percent. The corresponding not-seasonally-adjusted national rate for February 2021 was 6.6 percent.   

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 3.6 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was 3.8 percent.

EMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,796,100 in February 2021, down by 11,600 from the revised January 2021 figure. However, the January 2021 total was revised upward by 2,600 from the preliminary estimate, producing a revised increase of 8,500 jobs from December 2020 to January 2021 and a revised decrease of     126,300 jobs from January 2020 to January 2021. 

Goods-producing industries lost 6,900 jobs over the month, with decreases of 4,100 in manufacturing and 2,800 in mining, logging & construction. Meanwhile, service-providing industries lost 4,700 jobs between January and February, with an increase in leisure & hospitality (+3,100 jobs) outweighed by losses in professional & business services (-3,200 jobs) and educational & health services (-2,900 jobs). Smaller losses occurred in financial activities (-900 jobs), “other services” (-500 jobs), and trade, transportation & utilities (-400 jobs). Government employment decreased by 500 over the month, with gains in federal (+300) and state government (+2,600) exceeded by losses in local government (-3,100). 

Total payroll employment decreased by 130,500 jobs from February 2020 to February 2021. As in January, over-the-year job losses were widespread among the major sectors of the labor market, with only trade, transportation & utilities spared. Goods-producing industries lost 16,900 jobs over the month, proportionally divided between manufacturing (-10,300 jobs) and mining, logging & construction (-6,600 jobs). Service-providing industries took a harder hit, losing 113,600 jobs over the year, with nearly half the loss in leisure & hospitality (-52,300 jobs). Educational & health services lost 17,000 jobs over the year, professional & business lost 14,100 jobs, “other services” lost 6,100 jobs, financial activities lost 4,500 jobs and information lost 2,800 jobs. Government employment also decreased over the year, losing 17,100 jobs.

See the full Jobs Report here.

January 2021

(NOTE: Employment and unemployment estimates for 2020 and previous years have been revised to an updated benchmark.)

Missouri non-farm payroll employment increased in January 2021, and the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by a tenth of a percentage point. Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 5,900 jobs over the month, but over-the year job losses were back above 100,000 following benchmark adjustments to 2020 estimates. The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 4.3 percent in January 2021, down from 4.4 percent in December 2020. 

UNEMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by a tenth of a percentage point in January 2021, dropping to 4.3 percent from a benchmarked December 2020 rate of 4.4 percent. Missouri’s unemployment rate was below the national rate of 6.3 percent in January.

Due to the lingering effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, the January 2021 rate was 0.7 percentage points higher than the January 2020 rate. The rate had reached a low of 3.1 percent starting in July 2018, before gradually edging up to 3.5 percent by the end of 2019, and then to 3.7 percent in March 2020. The COVID-19 effect hit in April 2020, spiking the rate to 12.5 percent for that month. The rate decreased monthly for the rest of 2020, reaching 4.4 percent in December. 

Benchmarking revisions caused Missouri’s unemployment rate to be a tenth of a percentage point higher than the national rate in January and February of 2020, so Missouri’s streak of seasonally adjusted unemployment rates below the comparable national rates is now 11 consecutive months. 

The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 130,822 in January 2021, down by 4,290 from December 2020’s 135,112.

The state’s not-seasonally-adjusted rate was 5.1 percent in January 2021, up by 0.5 percentage points from the December 2020 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 4.6 percent. The corresponding not-seasonally-adjusted national rate for January 2021 was 6.8 percent.

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 3.6 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was 4.0 percent.

EMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted non-farm payroll employment was 2,805,100 in January 2021, up by 5,900 from the newly benchmarked December 2020 figure. However, the December 2020 total was revised downward by 10,600 from the preliminary estimate based on a previous benchmark, producing a revised increase of 9,200 jobs from November 2020 to December 2020 and a revised decrease of 128,900 jobs from December 2019 to December 2020. 

Goods-producing industries gained 1,700 jobs over the month, with increases of 1,200 in manufacturing and 500 in mining, logging & construction. Meanwhile, service-providing industries added 4,200 jobs between December and January, with increases in educational & health services (+3,600 jobs), leisure & hospitality (+2,500 jobs) and professional & business services (+1,800 jobs) exceeding losses in financial activities        (-3,600 jobs) and trade, transportation & utilities (-1,000 jobs). Government employment decreased by 300 over the month, with a gain in local government cancelled out by losses in federal and state government. 

Total payroll employment decreased by 124,800 jobs from January 2020 to January 2021. Over-the-year job losses were widespread among the major sectors of the labor market, with only trade, transportation & utilities spared. Goods-producing industries lost 10,600 jobs over the year, proportionally divided between manufacturing (-7,400 jobs) and mining, logging & construction (-3,200 jobs). Service-providing industries took a harder hit, losing 114,200 jobs over the year, with nearly half the loss in leisure & hospitality (-56,100 jobs). Professional & business lost 15,900 jobs over the year, educational & health services lost 11,900 jobs, “other services” lost 5,500 jobs, financial activities lost 4,000 jobs and information lost 3,300 jobs. Government employment also decreased over the year, losing 17,900 jobs.

See the full Jobs Report here.

December 2020

Missouri non-farm payroll employment increased again in December 2020, but a large increase in the civilian labor force sent unemployment higher. Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 10,400 jobs over the month, and over-the year job losses from COVID-19 shutdowns fell below 100,000. However, the state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased by 1.3 percentage points from November 2020 to December 2020 as the civilian labor force increased by more than 70,000 over the month. The labor market still showed substantial losses from 2019 levels, and ongoing COVID infections pose a threat of continued economic challenges.

Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased by 1.3 percentage points in December 2020, jumping to 5.8 percent from a revised November 2020 rate of 4.5 percent.

The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 180,137 in December 2020, up by 45,701 from November’s 134,436.

Despite the increase, Missouri’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate has now been either below or equal to the national rate for 69 consecutive months. The national unemployment rate was 6.7 percent in December 2020. 

Due to lingering layoffs from COVID-19 shutdowns, Missouri’s December 2020 rate was also 2.4 percentage points higher than the December 2019 rate. After record lows in 2018 and slow increases in 2019, the rate spiked beginning in March 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The rate peaked at 10.2 percent in April 2020 before decreasing slightly in May 2020, then moving strongly lower in June and July of 2020 as COVID-19 restrictions were eased. After a growing number of COVID-19 cases in August 2020 caused a small setback for the labor market, unemployment again decreased sharply in September 2020, followed by smaller decreases in October 2020 and November 2020, before an increase of 70,532 in the statewide civilian labor force in December 2020 caused a substantial jump in unemployment.

The state’s not-seasonally-adjusted rate was also 5.8 percent in December 2020, up by 1.8 percentage points from the November 2020 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 4.0 percent. The corresponding not-seasonally-adjusted national rate for December 2020 was 6.5 percent. A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 3.4 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was also 3.4 percent.

EMPLOYMENT

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,809,800 in December 2020, up by 10,400 from the revised November figure. In addition, the November 2020 total was revised upward by 2,300 from the preliminary estimate, producing a revised increase of 19,700 jobs from October 2020 to November 2020 and a revised decrease of 105,800 jobs from November 2019 to November 2020.

Service-providing industries accounted for over 90 percent of the private-sector employment gains over the month, with the largest increases in trade, transportation & utilities (+6,300 jobs), professional & business services (+3,100 jobs) and leisure & hospitality (+1,800 jobs). Educational & health services, however, went against the trend, losing 1,100 jobs). Among goods-producing industries, non-durable goods manufacturing had the only substantial gain, adding 1,400 jobs, while durable goods manufacturing lost 500 jobs and construction was essentially unchanged. Government employment showed only minor changes, adding 300 jobs over the month. It should be noted that seasonal adjustment factors may be subject to revision, given that they are based on a statistical time series that preceded the COVID-19 pandemic.

Total payroll employment decreased by 89,600 jobs from December 2019 to December 2020. Over-the-year job losses were widespread among the major sectors of the labor market, with only construction and “other services” spared. However, a large increase of 7,900 jobs in construction did produce a net gain of 2,400 jobs over the year in goods-producing industries, despite a loss of 5,500 jobs in manufacturing. Meanwhile, service-providing industries lost 92,000 jobs from December 2019 to December 2020. Leisure & hospitality continued to be the industry group most severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, losing 56,600 jobs over the year, a decrease of 18.3 percent. Educational & health services lost 11,400 jobs (-2.3 percent), professional & business services lost 4,900 jobs (-1.3 percent), information lost 3,400 jobs (-7.3 percent), financial activities lost 2,000 jobs and trade, transportation & utilities lost 1,900 jobs (-0.3 percent). Government employment decreased by 12,000 jobs (-2.7 percent) over the year.

See the full Jobs Report here.

November 2020

The Missouri labor market showed further improvement in November 2020. Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 17,400 jobs over the month. The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by 0.2 percentage points from October 2020 to November 2020, and the civilian labor force increased more than 23,000. However, the labor market still showed substantial losses from 2019 levels, and a third wave of COVID-19 infections pose a threat of renewed economic challenges in the coming months. 

Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate went down by 0.2 percentage points in November 2020, decreasing to 4.4 percent from the October 2020 rate of 4.6 percent. 

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate has now been either below or equal to the national rate for 68 consecutive months. The national unemployment rate was 6.7 percent in November 2020, also down 0.2 percentage points from 6.9 percent in October 2020.

The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 131,215 in November 2020, down by 4,766 from October’s 135,981.

Due to lingering layoffs from COVID-19 impacts, the state’s November 2020 rate was still 1 percentage point higher than the November 2019 rate. The rate had reached a record low of 3.0 percent starting in August 2018, before edging up a tenth of a point in November 2018 and again in December 2018. The rate had remained at 3.2 percent through April 2019 before decreasing by a tenth of a point in May 2019. It then began a slow increase, reaching 3.4 percent in November 2019, where it remained for the remainder of 2019. The rate was steady at 3.5 percent in January and February 2020 before the COVID-19 spike began in March 2020. The rate peaked at 10.2 percent in April 2020 before decreasing slightly in May 2020, then moving strongly lower in June and July of 2020 as COVID-19 restrictions were eased. After a second wave of COVID-19 infections in August 2020 caused a small setback for the labor market, unemployment again decreased sharply in September 2020, followed by smaller decreases in October 2020 and November 2020.   

The state’s not-seasonally-adjusted rate was 3.9 percent in November 2020, up by a tenth of a percentage point from the October 2020 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 3.8 percent. The corresponding not-seasonally-adjusted national rate for November 2020 was 6.4 percent.   

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 3.4 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was 3.1 percent.

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,797,100 in November 2020, up by 17,400 from the revised September figure. However, the October 2020 total was revised downward by 3,500 from the preliminary estimate, producing a revised increase of 2,900 jobs from September 2020 to October 2020 and a revised decrease of 125,300 jobs from October 2019 to October 2020. (See “Revisions” below.)

Both goods-producing industries and service-providing industries contributed to private-sector employment gains over the month, with the largest increases in trade, transportation & utilities (+8,000 jobs), educational & health services (+5,500 jobs) and manufacturing (+5,200 jobs). Smaller gains occurred in financial activities (+1,400 jobs), professional & business services (+1,200 jobs) and construction (+600 jobs). Bucking the upward trend were government (-3,200 jobs) and leisure & hospitality (-600 jobs). It should be noted that seasonal adjustment factors may be subject to revision, given that they are based on a statistical time series that preceded the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Total payroll employment decreased by 108,100 jobs from November 2019 to November 2020. As in October, over-the-year job losses were widespread among the major sectors of the labor market, with only construction and “other services” spared. However, a large increase of 9,600 jobs in construction did produce a net gain of 2,100 jobs over the year in goods-producing industries despite a loss of 7,500 jobs in manufacturing. Meanwhile, service-providing industries lost 110,200 jobs from November 2019 to November 2020. Leisure & hospitality continued to be the industry group most severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, losing 58,800 jobs over the year, a decrease of 19.0 percent. Professional & business services lost 13,700 jobs (-3.6 percent), educational & health services lost 13,400 jobs (-2.8 percent) and trade, transportation & utilities lost 9,100 jobs (-1.7 percent). Smaller losses occurred in the information sector (-3,200 jobs) and in financial activities (-1,900 jobs). Government employment decreased by 12,000 jobs over the year.

See the full Jobs Report here.

October 2020

The Missouri labor market showed mixed results in October 2020. Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 6,400 jobs over the month, but over-the-year job losses resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic remained stubbornly high. The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by 0.2 percentage points from September 2020 to October 2020, but the civilian labor force decreased more than 16,000.

Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate went down by 0.2 percentage points in October 2020, decreasing to 4.6 percent from a revised September 2020 rate of 4.8 percent. Due to lingering layoffs from COVID-19 shutdowns, the October 2020 rate was still 1.2 percentage points higher than the October 2019 rate. 

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate has now been either below or equal to the national rate for 68 consecutive months. The national unemployment rate was 6.9 percent in October 2020.

The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 137,729 in October 2020, down by 6,083 from September’s 143,812.

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate had reached a record low of 3.0 percent starting in August 2018, before edging up a tenth of a point in November 2018 and again in December 2018. The rate had remained at 3.2 percent through April 2019 before decreasing by a tenth of a point in May 2019. It then began a slow increase, reaching 3.4 percent in October 2019, where it remained for the remainder of 2019. The rate was steady at 3.5 percent in January and February 2020 before the COVID-19 spike began in March 2020. The rate peaked at 10.2 percent in April 2020 before decreasing slightly in May 2020, then moving strongly lower in June and July of 2020 as COVID-19 restrictions were eased. After a slight uptick in August 2020, unemployment decreased sharply in September 2020, followed by a smaller decrease in October 2020. The civilian labor force decrease noted above can be attributed to the loss of labor force members being counted due to them exhausting their eligibility for UI benefits and are no longer counted in the labor force computations. 

The state’s not-seasonally-adjusted rate was 3.8 percent in October 2020, down by 0.5 percentage points from the September 2020 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 4.3 percent. The corresponding not-seasonally-adjusted national rate for October 2020 was 6.6 percent.   

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 3.4 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was 2.8 percent.

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,783,200 in October 2020, up by 6,400 from the revised September figure. Private-sector employment gains over the month were concentrated in private-sector service-providing industries, with the largest increases in trade, transportation & utilities (+3,200 jobs), “other services” (+3,200 jobs), professional & business services (+2,800 jobs), educational & health services (+1,600 jobs) and financial activities (+1,400 jobs). Service-providing job losses occurred in government (-2,200 jobs) and leisure & hospitality (-1,100 jobs). Goods-producing industries showed a net loss of 2,500 jobs with a gain in construction (+3,300 jobs) exceeded by losses in manufacturing (-5,700 jobs) and mining & logging (-100 jobs). It should be noted that seasonal adjustment factors may be subject to revision, given that they are based on a statistical time series that preceded the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Total payroll employment decreased by 121,800 jobs from October 2019 to October 2020. As in September, over-the-year job losses were widespread among the major sectors of the labor market, with only construction and “other services” spared. Goods-producing industries lost 3,500 jobs over the year, and service-providing industries lost 118,300 jobs. Manufacturing employment was down by 12,800 (-4.6 percent), while construction, aided by less severe COVID-19 restrictions for outdoor work, showed an increase of 9,600 jobs (+7.6 percent). Among service-providing industries, leisure & hospitality lost 55,600 jobs over the year, a decrease of 17.9 percent. Educational & health services lost 19,000 jobs (-3.9 percent), while employment in trade, transportation & utilities was down by 18,000 (-3.3 percent). Professional & business services lost 13,600 jobs (-3.6 percent) and the information sector lost 3,400 jobs (-7.3 percent). Government employment moved to the negative side of the spreadsheet, losing 9,300 jobs (-2.1 percent) over the year.

See the full Jobs Report here.

September 2020

The Missouri labor market’s recovery resumed in September 2020. Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 13,000 jobs over the month, and over-the year job losses from COVID-19 shutdowns dropped below 125,000. Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate went down by 2.1 percentage points in September 2020, decreasing to 4.9 percent from an August 2020 rate of 7.0 percent. 

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate has now been either below or equal to the national rate for 67 consecutive months. The national unemployment rate was 7.9 percent in September 2020. 

The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 146,051 in September 2020, down by 68,345 from August’s 214,396. The over-the-month drop is due in part to the unemployed workers exhausting their Unemployment Insurance benefits and leaving the labor market. The change contributed to the 2.3 percent decline in Missouri’s total civilian labor force over the month. 

Due to lingering layoffs from COVID-19 shutdowns, the September 2020 rate was still nearly 50 percent higher than the September 2019 rate. The rate had reached a record low of 3.0 percent starting in August 2018, before edging up a tenth of a point in November 2018 and again in December 2018. The rate had remained at 3.2 percent through April 2019 before decreasing by a tenth of a point in May 2019. It then began a slow increase, reaching 3.4 percent in October 2019, where it remained for the remainder of 2019. The rate was steady at 3.5 percent in January and February 2020 before the COVID-19 spike began in March 2020. The rate peaked at 10.2 percent in April 2020 before decreasing slightly in May 2020, then moving strongly lower in June and July of 2020 as COVID-19 restrictions were eased. The rate was unchanged in August 2020 , and unemployment again decreased sharply in September 2020.   

The state’s not-seasonally-adjusted rate was 4.3 percent in September 2020, down by 2.8 percentage points from the August 2020 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 7.1 percent. The corresponding not-seasonally-adjusted national rate for September 2020 was 7.7 percent.  

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 3.3 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was 2.7 percent.

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,784,500 in September 2020, up by 13,000 from the revised August figure. In addition, the August 2020 total was revised upward by 2,000 from the preliminary estimate, producing a revised increase of 7,700 jobs from July 2020 to August 2020 and a revised decrease of 135,600 jobs from August 2019 to August 2020. 

Private-sector employment gains occurred in seven major industry groups over the month, with the largest increases in government (+4,600 jobs), trade, transportation & utilities (+2,500 jobs), construction (+2,100 jobs) and leisure & hospitality (+1,500 jobs).  The only major groups not sharing in the gains were professional & business services (-1,000 jobs) and educational & health services, which had a small loss of 300 jobs over the month. 

Total payroll employment decreased by 121,900 jobs from September 2019 to September 2020. As in August, over-the-year job losses were widespread among the major sectors of the labor market, with only construction, “other services” and government spared. Goods-producing industries lost 4,100 jobs over the year, and service-providing industries lost 117,800 jobs. Manufacturing employment was down by 8,700 (-3.1 percent), while construction, aided by less severe COVID-19 restrictions for outdoor work, showed an increase of 4,900 jobs (+3.9 percent). Among service-providing industries, leisure & hospitality lost 50,900 jobs over the year, a decrease of 16.5 percent. Educational & health services lost 23,000 jobs (-4.7 percent), while employment in trade, transportation & utilities was down by 20,700 (-3.8 percent). Professional & business services lost 17,600 jobs (-4.6 percent) and the information sector lost 4,800 jobs (-10.1 percent). Government employment was up by 3,100 jobs (+0.7 percent) over the year.

See the full Jobs Report here.

August 2020

The pace of Missouri labor market’s recovery was essentially flat in August 2020. Employment, seasonally adjusted, decreased by 1,200 jobs over the month, and over-the year job losses increased slightly from upwardly revised July levels. The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased by one-tenth of a percentage point from July 2020 to August 2020. 

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate has now been either below or equal to the national rate for 66 consecutive months. The national unemployment rate was 8.4 percent in August 2020. 

The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 215,249 in August 2020, up by 3,825 from July’s revised 211,424.

Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate went up by a tenth of a percentage point in August 2020, increasing to 7.0 percent from the July 2020 rate of 6.9 percent.

Due to on-going impacts of COVID-19 shutdowns, the August 2020 rate was still more than double the August 2019 rate. The rate had reached a record low of 3.0 percent starting in July 2018, before edging up a tenth of a point in November 2018 and again in December 2018. The rate had remained at 3.2 percent through April 2019 before decreasing by a tenth of a point in May 2019. It then began a slow increase, reaching 3.4 percent in October 2019, where it remained for the remainder of 2019. The rate was steady at 3.5 percent in January and February 2020 before the COVID-19 spike began in March 2020. The rate peaked at 10.2 percent in April 2020 before decreasing slightly in May 2020, then moving strongly lower in June and July of 2020 as COVID-19 restrictions were eased.

The state’s not-seasonally-adjusted rate was 7.1 percent in August 2020, down by a tenth of a percentage point from the July 2020 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 7.2 percent. The corresponding not-seasonally-adjusted national rate for August 2020 was 8.5 percent.  

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 3.2 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was 3.5 percent.

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,778,900 in August 2020, down by 1,200 from the revised July figure. At a less than one percent decline, employment was essentially flat for the month. However, the July 2020 total was revised upward by 18,900 from the preliminary estimate, producing a revised increase of 88,300 jobs from June 2020 to July 2020 and a revised decrease of 123,400 jobs from July 2019 to July 2020.

Private-sector employment gains did occur in some industries over the month, with increases continuing in leisure & hospitality (+3,600 jobs, of which 3,100 were in accommodation & food services), federal government (+3,400 jobs) and retail trade (+1,400 jobs). However, those gains were exceeded by losses in local government (-2,800 jobs), wholesale trade (-2,400 jobs), educational & health services (-1,600 jobs), manufacturing (-1,000 jobs) and financial activities (-1,000 jobs). It should be noted that the estimated job loss in local government was based on seasonal adjustment factors using a statistical time series that preceded the COVID-19 pandemic. Future data may find this adjustment to be less applicable as employment during the pandemic has varied from historic trends.

Total payroll employment decreased by 125,800 jobs from August 2019 to August 2020. As in July, over-the-year job losses were widespread among the major sectors of the labor market, with only construction spared. Goods-producing industries lost 5,500 jobs over the year, and service-providing industries lost 122,700 jobs. Manufacturing employment was down by 8,000 (-2.9 percent), while construction showed an increase of 2,800 jobs (+2.2 percent). Among service-providing industries, leisure & hospitality lost 49,000 jobs over the year. The sector had lost half its total employment between April 2019 and April 2020, but has cut that loss to 15.9 percent between August 2019 and August 2020. Trade, transportation & utilities lost 23,100 jobs (-4.3 percent), while employment in educational & health services was down by 21,800 (-4.5 percent). Professional & business services lost 15,000 jobs (-3.9 percent) and the information sector lost 5,700 jobs (-11.9 percent). Government employment was down by 2,400 jobs (-0.5 percent) over the year.

See the full Jobs Report here.

July 2020

The Missouri labor market continued to recover in July 2020, following major job losses due to COVID-19 shutdowns earlier in the year. Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 52,200 jobs over the month. Over-the year job losses, though still substantial, have diminished as the economy has gradually reopened. Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased to 6.9 percent in July 2020 from a revised June 2020 rate of 7.8 percent, a decrease of nine-tenths of a percentage point. 

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate has now been either below or equal to the national rate for 65 consecutive months. The national unemployment rate was 10.2 percent in July 2020. 

The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 211,177 in July 2020, down by 25,026 from June’s 236,203. 

Due to lingering layoffs from COVID-19 shutdowns, the July 2020 seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was still more than double the July 2019 rate. The rate had reached a record low of 3.0 percent starting in July 2018, before edging up a tenth of a point in November 2018 and again in December 2018. The rate had remained at 3.2 percent through April 2019 before decreasing by a tenth of a point in May 2019. It then began a slow increase, reaching 3.4 percent in October 2019, where it remained for the remainder of 2019. The rate was steady at 3.5 percent in January and February 2020 before the COVID-19 spike began in March 2020. The rate peaked at 10.2 percent in April 2020 before decreasing slightly in May 2020, then moving strongly lower in June and July of 2020 as COVID-19 restrictions were eased. 

The state’s not-seasonally-adjusted rate was 7.2 percent in July 2020, down by seven-tenths of a percentage point from the June 2020 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 7.9 percent. The corresponding national rate was 10.5 percent. 

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 3.2 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was 3.8 percent.

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,761,200 in July 2020, up by 52,200 from the revised June figure. In addition, the June 2020 total was revised upward by 19,800 from the preliminary estimate, producing a revised increase of 91,400 jobs from May 2020 to June 2020 and a revised decrease of 189,800 jobs from June 2019 to June 2020.

Private-sector employment gains over the month were again widespread, with substantial increases continuing in both goods-producing industries (+8,300 jobs) and service-providing industries (+43,900 jobs). Goods-producing gains were divided between manufacturing (+6,000 jobs) and construction (+2,300 jobs). Among service-providing industries, leisure & hospitality – the sector hardest hit by COVID-19 – added 14,500 jobs in July, with 11,600 of those coming in accommodation & food services. Trade, transportation & utilities added 5,900 jobs, educational & health services added 4,200 and professional & business services added 3,300. 

While payroll employment improved over the month, it still showed a sizable decrease over the year, though less so than in the earlier months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Total payroll employment decreased by 142,300 jobs from July 2019 to July 2020. As in June, over-the-year job losses were widespread among the major sectors of the labor market, with only construction spared. Goods-producing industries lost 2,900 jobs over the year, and service-providing industries lost 139,400 jobs. Manufacturing employment was down by 5,700 (-2.1 percent), while construction showed an increase of 3,100 jobs (+2.4 percent). Among service-providing industries, leisure & hospitality lost 59,200 jobs over the year. The sector had lost half its total employment between April 2019 and April 2020, but has cut that loss to 19.2 percent between July 2019 and July 2020. Trade, transportation & utilities lost 21,900 jobs (-4.0 percent), while employment in educational & health services was down by 19,000 (-3.9 percent). Professional & business services lost 17,600 jobs (-4.6 percent) and the information sector lost 5,800 jobs (-12.1 percent). Government employment was down by 9,000 jobs (-2.1 percent) over the year. 

See the full Jobs Report here.

 

 

June 2020

July 16, 2020

Jefferson City

The Missouri labor market’s recovery continued in June 2020, following the major job losses earlier in the year from COVID-19 shutdowns. Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 71,600 jobs over the month, and over-the year job losses, though still substantial, were less than in April and May. The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased more than two full percentage points from May 2020 to June 2020, while May’s rate was unchanged from preliminary estimates.

Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate went down by 2.2 percentage points in June 2020, decreasing to 7.9 percent from a revised May 2020 rate of 10.1 percent. The national unemployment rate was 11.1 percent in June 2020. Missouri’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate has now been either below or equal to the national rate for 64 consecutive months.

Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 71,600 jobs over the month to total 2,689,200. Combining May and June, Missouri recovered approximately one-third of the jobs lost in March and April. The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 237,649 in June 2020, down by 65,998 from May’s 303,647.  

The state’s not-seasonally-adjusted rate was also 7.9 percent in June 2020, down by 1.9 percentage points from the May 2020 not-seasonally-adjusted rate of 9.8 percent. The corresponding national rate was 11.2 percent.  

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted rate had reached a record low of 3.0 percent starting in July 2018, before edging up a tenth of a point in November 2018 and again in February 2018. The rate had remained at 3.2 percent through May 2019 before decreasing by a tenth of a point in June 2019. It then began a slow increase, reaching 3.4 percent in October 2019, where it remained for the remainder of 2019. The rate was steady at 3.5 percent in January and February 2020 before the COVID-19 spike began in March 2020.

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 3.1 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was 3.4 percent.

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,689,200 in June 2020, up by 71,600 from the revised May figure. However, the May 2020 total was revised downward by 21,800 from the preliminary estimate, producing a revised increase of 50,900 jobs from April 2020 to May 2020 and a revised decrease of 282,400 jobs from May 2019 to May 2020.

Private-sector employment gains over the month were widespread, with substantial increases in both goods-producing industries (+9,700 jobs) and service-providing industries (+61,900 jobs). Goods-producing gains were concentrated in manufacturing (+9,900 jobs). Among service-providing industries, leisure & hospitality – the sector hardest hit by COVID-19 – added 36,400 jobs in June, with 31,100 of those coming in accommodation & food services. Trade, transportation & utilities added 20,500 jobs, professional & business services added 4,400 and “other services” added 2,700. An exception to the gains occurred in educational & health services (-3,000 jobs). An increase of 3,100 jobs in local government was mostly offset by a loss of 2,800 jobs in state government, while federal government employment showed little change.

While payroll employment improved over the month, it still showed a sizable decrease over the year, though less so than in April and May. Total payroll employment decreased by 209,600 jobs from June 2019 to June 2020. As in May, over-the-year job losses were all but universal, with only federal government (+1,000, helped by hiring for the decennial census of population) and construction spared. Goods-producing industries lost 16,000 jobs over the year, and service-providing industries lost 193,600 jobs. Manufacturing employment was down by 16,100 (-5.8 percent), while construction showed a small increase of 400 jobs (+0.3 percent). Among service-providing industries, leisure & hospitality lost 77,300 jobs (-25.1 percent) over the year. The sector had lost half its total employment between April 2019 and April 2020, but has cut that loss to a quarter of its total employment between June 2019 and June 2020. Trade, transportation & utilities lost 26,700 jobs (-4.9 percent), while employment in professional & business services was down by 23,900 (-6.3 percent). Educational & health services lost 20,800 jobs (-4.3 percent). Government employment decreased by 28,500 jobs, (-6.5 percent), with losses of 18,900 jobs in local government and 10,600 jobs in state government.

 

May 2020

June 18, 2020

Jefferson City

NOTE: Between the April 2020 preliminary and final estimates, some revisions were made to the seasonal adjustment factors for statewide employment and unemployment estimates by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. As a result of these revisions, the April 2020 seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was revised upward from 9.7 percent to 10.2 percent, while there was no revision to the not-seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate. In addition, the Missouri seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for March 2020 was revised downward to 3.9 percent, putting it below the national unemployment rate for that month.

Missouri’s labor market began a rebound in May 2020, following the major job losses in April 2020 from COVID-19 shutdowns. Employment, seasonally adjusted, increased by 32,900 jobs over the month, though still down by 260,600 over the year. Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate decreased by a tenth of a percentage point in May 2020, decreasing to 10.1 percent from a revised April 2020 rate of 10.2 percent.

However, the May 2020 rate was more than three times higher than the May 2019 rate. The rate had reached a record low of 3.0 percent starting in July 2018, before edging up a tenth of a point in November 2018 and again in February 2018. The rate had remained at 3.2 percent through April 2019 before decreasing by a tenth of a point in May 2019. It then began a slow increase, reaching 3.4 percent in October 2019, where it remained for the remainder of 2019. The rate was steady at 3.5 percent in January and February 2020 before the COVID-19 spike began in March 2020.

April 2020

May 22, 2020

Jefferson City

The COVID-19 pandemic caused a severe downturn in the nation’s labor market in April 2020. In Missouri, seasonally adjusted employment decreased by 305,100 jobs over the month, and by 327,800 jobs over the year, the largest one-month and one-year decreases since the current data series began in 1990. The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased to 9.7 percent over the month, more than doubling the previous month, and tripling over the year.

Missouri’s smoothed seasonally adjusted unemployment rate had its largest monthly and yearly increases ever in April 2020. The April 2020 rate of 9.7 percent was up by nearly six percentage points from the March 2020 rate of 3.9 percent and 6.5 percentage points from the April 2019 rate of 3.2 percent.

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was below the national rate, which was 14.7 percent in April 2020.

The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 292,690 in April 2020, up by 171,103 from March’s 109,616.

The state’s not-seasonally-adjusted rate was 9.8 percent in April 2020, up from 3.9 percent in March 2020. The corresponding national rate was 14.4 percent.  

Under normal circumstances, an increase in the unadjusted rate from March to April would be highly unusual, but COVID-19 resulted in unprecedented economic fluctuations. The rapidly changing economic situation will likely continue to evolve and be reflected in next month’s jobs report.

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,574,000 in April 2020, down by 305,100 from the revised March figure. Federal government (+200) and mining & logging (unchanged) saw less change than most sectors. Goods-producing industries lost 46,000 jobs over the month, and service-providing industries lost 259,100 jobs. Among goods-producing industries, durable goods manufacturing was hit the hardest, losing 26,700 jobs. Employment in construction decreased by 11,000, while non-durable manufacturing had a loss of 8,300 jobs. Among service-providing industries, accommodation & food services had the largest decrease, losing 110,700 jobs. Trade, transportation & utilities lost 42,600 jobs over the month. Professional & business services lost 29,500 jobs, and educational & health services lost 18,400 jobs. In the public sector, local government employment was down by 11,100, and state government lost 2,600 jobs. 

Payroll employment decreased by 327,800 jobs from April 2019 to April 2020. Only federal government (+1,100) saw an increase, helped in part by hiring for the federal census. Goods-producing industries lost 47,100 jobs over the year, and service-providing industries lost 280,700 jobs. Manufacturing employment was down by 38,000 (-13.7 percent), while construction, less severely affected because most work was outside, lost 9,000 jobs (-7.1 percent). Among service-providing industries, leisure & hospitality lost 152,100 jobs (-49.4 percent) over the year, shedding nearly half its employment. Trade, transportation & utilities lost 45,000 jobs (-8.3 percent), while employment in professional & business services was down by 27,800 (-7.3 percent). Educational & health services lost 21,500 jobs (-4.5 percent). Government employment decreased by 12,900 jobs, (-3.0 percent), with losses of 12,400 jobs in local government and 1,600 jobs in state government. 

March 2020

April 15, 2020

Jefferson City

Employment in Missouri decreased by 20,900 jobs over the month, and 12-month employment growth was lower than the March 2019 figure. The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 4.5 percent, up by one percentage point from the February 2020 rate of 3.5 percent.

 

January 2020

March 4, 2020

Jefferson City

Employment increased by 9,000 jobs in January while the state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased slightly to 3.5 percent over the month.

The unemployment rate had reached a record low of 3.0 percent starting in July 2018, before edging up a tenth of a point in November 2018 and again in December 2018. The rate had remained at 3.2 percent through April 2019 before decreasing by a tenth of a point in May 2019. It then began a slow increase, reaching 3.4 percent in October 2019, where it remained for the remainder of 2019.

This marks the 42nd consecutive month in which Missouri’s rate has been lower than the corresponding U.S. rate (currently 3.6 percent).  The Missouri rate has been equal to or lower than the U.S. rate for 58 consecutive months.

The estimated number of unemployed Missourians was 109,659 in January 2020, up by 3,287 from December’s 106,372.

The not-seasonally-adjusted rate increased from 3.4 percent in December 2019 to 4.2 percent in January 2020.  This increase in the not-seasonally-adjusted rate is typical for January, when activity in outdoor-oriented industries like construction and recreation reaches a low point. The not-seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate normally peaks in January and February before starting a steady decrease that lasts through the spring. The corresponding national rate was 4.0 percent.

A year ago, the state’s seasonally adjusted rate was 3.2 percent, and the not-adjusted rate was 3.8 percent.

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment was 2,908,400 in January 2020, up by 9,000 from the December figure. However, the December figure was revised downward by 14,800 from the preliminary estimate as a result of the September 2019 benchmark of employment.

Private-sector employment gains over the month occurred in both goods-producing and service-providing industries, with goods-producing industries adding 2,700 jobs and private-sector service-providing industries adding 6,300 jobs. Employment in construction increased by 2,000, while manufacturing had a smaller gain of 700 jobs. Among service-providing industries, professional & business services gained 3,800 jobs, trade, transportation & utilities gained 1,900 jobs and leisure & hospitality gained 900 jobs. Exceptions to the upward movement occurred in health care & social assistance, which lost 2,400 jobs, and accommodation & food services, down by 1,600 jobs.

As a result of the 2019 benchmark, 12-month job gains were substantially diminished in January 2020. Over the past year, payroll employment grew by 7,100 jobs, or 0.2 percent. Goods-producing industries accounted for 2,200 of the increase, with all of the increase concentrated in construction (+3,300 jobs). Private-sector service-providing industries added 2,700 jobs over the year, with gains in professional, scientific, and technical services (+4,600, +2.9 percent); educational & health services (+3,600, +0.7 percent); and accommodation and food services (+2,700, +1.0 percent). Overall gains in service-providing industries were held down by losses in administrative & support services (-7,600, -4.8 percent); information (-2,400, -4.9 percent); and retail trade (-2,200, -0.7 percent). Employment in government increased by 2,200 over the year (+0.5 percent), with increases of 1,800 jobs in federal government and 800 in state government offsetting a loss of 400 jobs in local government.

NOTE: With the production of January 2020 data, estimates are now benchmarked to a base of September 2019. The benchmark process involves replacing sample-based estimates with hard numbers from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW). 2019 estimates based on a September 2018 benchmark have been revised to conform to QCEW data through September 2019. One immediate result of the September 2019 benchmark was a notable reduction in 12-month employment increases.

November 2019

December 18, 2019

Jefferson City

Unemployment rate remains low and unchanged in November

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 3.1 percent in November 2019, remaining unchanged from October. Seasonal adjustment is a statistical technique used to measure and remove influences of predictable seasonal patterns to show how employment and unemployment change monthly.

While the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was unchanged over the month, employment in Missouri did increase strongly in November 2019, adding 5,300 jobs from October 2019.

Missouri has over-the-year job gains across key industries – with employment growing by 37,100 jobs, or 1.3 percent over the last year.

October 2019

November 14, 2019

Jefferson City

Unemployment rate remains low and unchanged in October

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 3.1 percent in October 2019, remaining unchanged from September. Seasonal adjustment is a statistical technique used to measure and remove influences of predictable seasonal patterns to show how employment and unemployment change monthly.

Missouri has over-the-year job gains across key industries – with employment growing by 35,200 jobs, or 1.2 percent over the last year.

September 2019

October 17, 2019

Jefferson City

Unemployment rate continues downward trend in September 

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 3.1 percent in September 2019, down a tenth of a percentage point from August. Seasonal adjustment is a statistical technique used to measure and remove influences of predictable seasonal patterns to show how employment and unemployment change monthly.

Missouri has over-the-year job gains across key industries – with employment growing by 32,100 jobs, or 1.1 percent over the last year.

 

August 2019

September 18, 2019

Jefferson City

Jobs continue to grow with unemployment decreasing slightly in August

Missouri’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 3.2 percent in August 2019, down a tenth of a percentage point from July. Seasonal adjustment is a statistical technique used to measure and remove influences of predictable seasonal patterns to show how employment and unemployment change monthly.

Job growth and low unemployment rates fuel Missouri's workforce and economy

The number of jobs in the state continue to rise, while the unemployment rate remains low.

Over the past year, employment has grown by 38,200 jobs.

Missouri sees over-the-year job gains across key industries.

Health Care and Social Assistance (+13,700 jobs, up 3.2 percent)
Accommodation and Food Services (+6,600 jobs, up 2.4 percent)
Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services (+5,700 jobs, up 3.5 percent) 

Startups provide positive impact on Missouri's economy

As reported by MOSourceLink, an average of 40,797 new jobs were created each year by small, first-time employers over the past five years, making up a significant portion of the new jobs added to the state’s economy. Small businesses and startup firms create jobs and pioneer innovations that help Missouri move forward and compete in a global economy.

While these new and young firms, which have fewer than 20 employees, are focused around population centers, they also exist throughout the state and across a variety of industries. The highest density of firms hiring their first employee in Missouri in 2018 were in Health Care and Social Assistance, Information, Transportation and Warehousing, and Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services.

 

July 2019

August 14, 2019

Jefferson City

Jobs continue to grow with unemployment at near-record lows in July

Missouri's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate has remained at 3.3 percent for the past five months. Seasonal adjustment is a statistical technique used to measure and remove influences of predictable seasonal patterns to show how employment and unemployment change monthly.

 

Job growth and low unemployment rates fuel Missouri's workforce

• The number of jobs in the state continue to rise, while the unemployment rate remains low.
        o Over the past year, employment has grown by 34,700 jobs.
• Missouri sees over-the-year job gains across key industries.
        o Health Care and Social Assistance (+12,200 jobs, up 2.9 percent)
        o Accommodation and Food Services (+5,500 jobs, up 2.1 percent)
        o Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services (+3,900 jobs, up 2.4 percent) 

June 2019

July 17, 2019

Jefferson City

Jobs continue to grow with unemployment at near-record lows in June

Missouri's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate has remained at 3.3 percent for the past four months. Seasonal adjustment is a statistical technique used to measure and remove influences of predictable seasonal patterns to show how employment and unemployment change monthly.